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Voters Want IDs at the Polls, Don’t See Them as Discriminatory

The state of Missouri is wrapping up its lawsuit over voter identification laws, which the plaintiffs in the case argue are discriminatory toward certain groups of people. Other states across the country, nonetheless, are attempting to enact their own voter identification laws leading up to November’s midterm elections.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 67% of Likely U.S. Voters think voters should be required to show photo identification such as a driver’s license before being allowed to vote. This is down slightly from 70% a year ago but down from a high of 82% in 2010. Support for voter ID requirements has mostly run in the mid-to-high 70s in surveys since 2006.

Twenty-eight percent (28%) do not want voter ID laws, up slightly from earlier surveys. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

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The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 27 and 30, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

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The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 27 and 30, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

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